Category Archives: Trucking

Trucking

Dealing with Texas Trucking Companies after a Truck Accident

An accident involving a truck and a car often leaves the driver of the car in chaos. Trucks are very large and carry a lot of momentum, and thus an accident involving a car can be a serious detriment to the car driver. As Texas trucking companies are going to want to protect their interests, it is best if a truck accident lawyer deals with the trucking companies from the start.

Truck companies have a lot to lose, and the driver of the truck may have a lot to lose. Most truck companies are a little more forthcoming with a lawyer than they are with the victim. Truck accident lawsuits can wipe out a trucking company over time, and thus trucking companies are very tight lipped, even when dealing with a truck accident lawyer.

A lawyer who has experience is not going to be intimidated out of filing a lawsuit, and an experienced lawyer is likely to already have a reputation within the trucking industry. By having an experienced lawyer representing you, the trucking company will understand that they are not likely to bully or talk their way around their share of responsibility for the damage caused in the accident.

This is vital, as once the facts start to be compiled, whether true of fictional, it is very difficult for the trucking company to negate the story they originally provided. Standing up tall against the trucking company by having strong representation can avoid potential problems from the beginning.

Nobody likes to be pushed around by a big company, and to a trucking company, your car accident isn’t something they want to deal with, in most cases. Most people who begin their interactions with the trucking company prior to retaining a truck accident lawyer report regretting this decision, as they felt they would have received a fair settlement much more quickly had they allowed a lawyer to file a lawsuit right from the beginning.

The filing of a lawsuit is just as much a statement to the trucking company as it is a quest for a fair settlement. Chances are your car was totaled in the accident, you sustained some extent of injury, and you lost at least some time from work. These factors are important to bring to light when dealing with a trucking company, and a lawyer is going to have a more profound knowledge as to whether or not anything the trucking company offers you is within the realm of fair.

Most people who file lawsuits aren’t looking to get rich, they are simply looking for the trucking company to step up to the plate and take on their responsibilities. Trucks and passenger cars often do not mix well together on the roadways, and due to their large size, trucks carry a higher obligation to avoid accidents.

Most truck accidents happens either due to passenger car interference like cutting too closely in front of a truck, or because the trucker was going too fast typically without enough sleep. Trucking companies set up the conditions for the latter type of accident by requiring more than reasonable amounts of driving from their truckers.

Often pay is by the mile and of course, the faster miles can completed the faster the trucker gets paid. A skilled lawyer can find numerous flaws and reasonable angles of responsibilities in this method of payment during a lawsuit.

A lawsuit boils down to one of two basic facts. Either the truck driver was responsible for the accident or the passenger car was responsible for the accident.

In either event, a truck accident lawyer is highly recommended to prevent the trucking company from taking advantage of you from the start. Any time you go up against a company, you want fierce and determined representation. This is what hiring a lawyer and filing a lawsuit is meant to provide.

There is a lot at stake for both you and the trucking company as the time of your lawsuit rolls near. You will want to thoroughly discuss with your lawyer the possible outcomes, your legal options, and what steps are advisable as you proceed through the process.

Experienced representation is always the best protection. Your lawsuit is certainly not the place to cut a few corners or to give the new guy on the block a chance, as professional representation is the most likely chance you will have at a fair recovery.

Nick Johnson
http://www.articlesbase.com/law-articles/dealing-with-texas-trucking-companies-after-a-truck-accident-132977.html

Trucking

Trucking Accidents: Federal Trucking Laws

Trucking accident cases are much more complicated than regular auto accident cases. There are many reasons for this, and a big one is the very complex set of federal laws which govern the trucking industry and which your attorney must thoroughly understand. Failure to comply with these laws is often at the heart of fault and responsibility in truck accidents.

All of these regulations carry with them strict rules for record keeping to prove compliance. Theoretically, this should make it easy to determine when laws were broken or mistakes were made. However, the massive amounts of paperwork can be difficult to navigate, and many trucking companies falsify documents or use elusive practices to obscure violations. It takes a very skilled trucking accident attorney to use these records properly. Your attorney must know which documents to request and how to read and interpret them to find any discrepancies which will reveal violations.

Time On the Road

Hours of service regulations (HOS) are the rules which govern how long a driver may spend on the road in one stretch, and how often he must rest. They are detailed and complicated outlining consecutive hours, total hours in a day, total hours in a month, and so on. HOS are a very controversial aspect of federal trucking regulations, and opponents believe that they actually contribute to, rather than reducing, fatigue.

Fatigue is a contributing factor in most trucking accidents. Fatigue and HOS violations are very often the result of unrealistic schedules imposed on drivers by trucking companies.

Truck drivers can lose their CDL (commercial driver’s license) for HOS violations, meaning that they lose their livelihood, so they are motivated to obey the law. But, refusing to comply with unrealistic schedules can also mean losing their job or being passed over for loads and, therefore, losing a paycheck. Competition is stiff in the trucking industry.

Truck drivers are required to keep log books which include records of their driving times and receipts for fuel purchases. Some drivers falsify entries, and some trucking companies instruct their drivers to falsify entries in order to make quicker deliveries.

At first glance, a log book may show that everything is on the up and up – that the driver was in compliance with HOS. On closer inspection however, discrepancies in receipt times and locations may not match up with driving time records, indicating that the driver did not comply with HOS or was speeding.

If it can be proven that the trucking company imposed an unrealistic schedule on the driver and/or encouraged the driver to falsify log book entries, the trucking company can be held responsible.

Furthermore, trucking companies have a duty to maintain their trucks and keep them in safe operating condition. Truck drivers play an important role in this process; they must inspect their trucks daily. Ultimately, however, the trucking company bears the burden and cannot require or allow a driver to operate an unsafe truck.

Hazardous Materials

The transportation of hazardous materials is very strictly regulated. A driver must have special training and hold a special class of license in order to transport them, and there are very specific rules and regulations regarding where they may be parked, what routes they can take and how they must be secured.

An accident involving hazardous materials can mean evacuations, injuries to large numbers of people, and serious property damage.

If you or a loved one has been injured in a trucking accident in Maryland, Virginia or Washington DC, please contact Chaikin, Sherman, Cammarata & Siegel, P.C. to speak with an experienced truck accident attorney.

Patricia Woloch
http://www.articlesbase.com/trucks-articles/trucking-accidents-federal-trucking-laws-695374.html

Tie Downs Trucking

Wrapping Up The Truck Tie Downs For 18 Wheelers

Here is the fact about tie down, they probably are talking about totally different things depends on the context, for instance, ratchet straps for truck are definitely two inches and ten thousand lbs tie down while ratchets for pick up will be 1” and 500 lbs tie down, we’re only going to discuss about truck tie downs here, more precisely, we will talk about flat beds only, usually you will be able to see those trucks on high way.

When the jobs come your way, odds are you won’t be able to decide what kind of cargo will be put on your truck, the only thing you can do is to prepare for all the opportunities , it’s almost always not for you to decide what stuff will be on your trailer . Talking about flat bed trucks, quite some of the flatbeds come with winches installed, or you can install by yourself at a later time, then you can use winch strap to do the job without the hassle of having to tie down both ends of the ratchet strap.

Traditionally slide in winch and truck winch strap are most popular tie down devices for flat beds . There is one thing required for truck winch and winch strap tie down combination, winch bar, which is the tool to help you tie down the cargo on the flatbed, since you can only tighten the winch straps through turning winch barrel, this only can be done by utilizing winch bars.

Some flat beds come with winches installed, not all trailers have winches installed. When the trailer have the winches installed, we can use winch straps to tie down loads on the trailer , usually we tie down steel coils, concrete pipes, skids, anything that not too heavy for the 5400lbs working load limit. Both flat hooks and wire hooks may be used on 2”, 3” and 4” winch straps, but flat hooks are more popular than wire hooks, you may see flat hooks on all size winch straps while wire hooks mostly on 2” straps. Truck winches come in with two different flavors, two inches and 4 inches wide , but winch straps have width of 2”, 3” and 4”, it’s obvious you can put 3” winch straps in 4” winches, when we look at the length of the winch strap, the range is pretty wide for regular use, from around 20 feet to more than 60 feet, 27′ and 30′ being the most common length available.

Of course we just can’t leave out the most used tie down equipment for transportation businesses, ratchet strap. In fact that the ratchet straps are just the assembly of ratchet buckles and tie down webbing, which can be nylon or polyester, the combination of different ratchet buckles and different straps gives us many choices.

The ratchet tie down earned it’s popularity by being the most flexible, adaptable and capable tie down devices , from sedans to eighteen wheelers , you can see ratchet straps anywhere cargo needs to be secured. With flat hooks, wire hooks, cloth loops, chain anchors, even endless, ratchets just can’t have enough variety, how can we don’t love these ratchets? The smallest width for ratchets is 1”, 4” is the widest, while the length of ratchets may be anything from inches to more than 60 feet. The reason we say that ratchet straps are most popular tie down devices for most trucks can be found in this paragraph, even for flatbeds which use winch straps massively may find ratchet straps attractive if there are no winches installed on the truck.

Before you go out or get online to get these tie down straps , you should learn how to get more out of it while spend less , most important thing is the quality of the straps, maybe you know the local store stuff quality, when talking about websites you need to find out by reading other people’s the reviews, trucking blogs, such as trucker’s deal , customer feed backs, or by some other venues to determine whether the products and services are worth the salt.

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Tie Downs Trucking

The Truck Tie Down Straps

When it comes to tie down, you have to bear in your mind that there are totally different things, there are different kind of trucks, box truck, pickup truck, flatbeds, etc., they use similar or different tie downs, even for same kind of trucks, people probably will use totally different tie downs, say e track straps or plain ratchet straps for box trucks, so try to talk about generic tie downs is not a good idea, to make things simple, I’m sure you’ve already seen flatbed tie downs on the road, we will only talk about flat beds for the time being.

When the jobs come your way, odds are you won’t be able to decide what kind of stuff will be put on your truck, the only thing you can do is to prepare for all the possibilities , most of the time you don’t get to choose what you like or want to do. We are going to introduce truck tie down straps only, since the are popular tie down devices on flatbeds, and it should be the most popular tie downs on all trucks as well. .

For most flat bed trucks, truck winch and winch straps are what we usually use to tie down stuff, some trailers come with winches installed you only have to get winch strap. When you work with truck winches and winch straps, there is one thing you can’t live without: winch bars, these steel bars are essential for your job, so get one if you don’t already have one.

Usually most flatbeds will be sold with winches installed, there are still some of them come without winches though, in this case the drivers may use ratchet straps or binder chains as alternative. When the flat bed have the winches installed, we can use winch tie down straps to tie down articles on the trailer , usually we tie down steel coils, concrete pipes, skids, anything that not too heavy for the 5400lbs working load limit. Both flat hooks and wire hooks may be used on 2”, 3” and 4” winch straps, but flat hooks are more popular than wire hooks, you may see flat hooks on all size winch straps while wire hooks mostly on 2” straps. We can find 2” and 4” winches and 2” and 4” winch straps , depends on different applications , the length of strap can be 20′, 25′, 27′, 30′, 35′, 40′ or more than 50 feet.

OK, now let’s talk about ratchet strap which is the most popular tie down devices for all kinds of trucks or hauling  businesses. What we call ratchet straps are actually assemblies, the ratchet buckles with short straps, one foot or longer, and the long straps, 6 feet or longer.

The ratchet strap earned it’s popularity by being the most flexible, adaptable and capable tie down devices , from passenger cars to eighteen wheelers , you can see ratchet straps anywhere cargo needs to be secured. With flat hooks, wire hooks, cloth loops, chain anchors, even endless, ratchets just can’t have enough variety, how can we don’t love these ratchets? The smallest width for ratchets is 1”, 4” is the widest, while the length of ratchets may be anything from inches to more than 60 feet. On commercial trucks ratchet tie downs are the best tie down devices for shippers , those trailers without winches installed will figure that ratchet straps are pretty important.

Before you go out or go online to buy these tie down straps , you will have to know how to get most out of them with less spending , top priority is the quality of the straps, most likely you will know the quality of local store stuff, when talking about online stores you should evaluate them by reading other people’s the reviews, trucking blogs, such as trucker’s deal , online feed backs, or by some other venues to make sure if the products and service are good or not.

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Tie Downs Trucking

Flatbed Tie Down 101: why choose the winch straps and winch bars

So far truck winches and winch straps are only being used with flatbeds, I don’t know the exact percentage but a big portion of flatbeds sold with winches installed, this is a big plus for most drivers since they only need to get winch straps and winch bars(assume they don’t have them) to get started, and the plastic corner protectors maybe required or optional depends on what kind of loads on the truck. A few different kinds of truck winches are available, most seen ones are slide in winches and weld on winches, to use slide in winches the flatbeds have to have rails installed at one side of the truck bed, 2” and 4” are most popular sizes of truck winches, and of course we can say that 2” & 4” winch straps are the most popular ones, 3” winch straps are not that popular but you still can see them from time to time.

The way the truck winch and strap system works is pretty simple, the mandrel, the part into which you can insert the tie down strap, can be used to tighten the winch straps easily, thus tie the loads down pretty much by just put winch bar into the winch side hole then turn as many rounds as needed until the loads are secured properly. The winch structure is pretty simple, there is a barrel goes through the winch body, one side has a though hole and the other side has a gear with a brake, in between lies the mandrel, just put the straps into it, close the brake on the gear will allow you the tighten the straps over the load, since the gear is only allowed to go one direction, when you untie the strap, open the brake, turn the barrel the opposite direction to pull the  strap off the load. You are required to use a winch bar with the truck winch, you can use something like a wood stick or wood beam with, it’s not safe and not legal as well.

There usually are 2 kind of standard winch bars, chromated one and black one, and two different combination winch bars, chromated and painted half yellow, you can find them online or locally. Sometimes people get confused with all the different winch bars, they are only used with truck winches after all, why all the different styles? It all comes down to personal preferences and specific needs, for instance, with combination winch bar you can use something else with it, say using a standard winch bar with a combination winch bar under some special circumstances.

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